DRY TRANSFERS BASICS

This is the basic idea of dry transfers and is the primary way to apply them. No matter what other method you use you will need to understand this method. Follow four simple steps and yields excellent results with minimal mess.

TRIM





For Large Dry Transfers:


Cut transfers from the sheet to simplify handling and eliminate the risk of inadvertently transferring an adjacent object. Cut with a hobby knife or a scissor.






For Small Dry Transfers:

Cut transfers into strips for easier handling. The single most difficult thing to master with these is to get them positioned correctly and cutting them into strips will make this task much simpler. You will also be doing additional trimming to get the strip to fit into tight places.

NOTE: If you are going to create a word with individual letters cut the whole line of letters from the sheet equidistant from the bottoms of the letters. Use a piece of tape on the model as a guide line and keep the bottom of the trimmed transfer on this guide. This way you will avoid having the letters staggered in a random manner and each letter in your word will be properly positioned.

RUB ONTO MODEL



For Large Dry Transfers:

Position the transfer and, if you wish, use a small piece of artists tape to hold the backing film in place. Start at one end and work across. Do not use excess pressure and do not allow the backing to move around. Use only enough pressure to get the transfer onto the model.







For Small Dry Transfers:

Position carefully while keeping the backing paper under the portion that you do not want to transfer. Using a burnishing tool, rub over the transfer applying just enough pressure to cause the ink to separate from the carrier film and onto the model. Notice how the backing paper is slid back only enough to expose the desired transfer while protecting the other transfers from accidental transfer.

SMOOTH, LIFT AND CHECK




For Large Dry Transfers:


Use a cotton swab and the backing paper to smooth out any large wrinkles. Prick any bubbles with a needle. Do not allow the backing paper to move around on the surface of the transfer because it is slightly abrasive and could ruin the transfer.

FOR ZIMMERIT: Use a piece of foam rubber to push the transfer into recesses.






For Small Dry Transfers:

Being careful not to move the backing film, gently lift the edge to check that everything has transferred. If not lay the film back down and rub only over the items which have not transferred. Continue checking until everything has transferred onto the model.



BURNISH




For Large Dry Transfers:

Lay the backing paper over the transfer and burnish to set the adhesive. Burnishing can be done with any flat bladed tool made from wood or plastic or one of the commercial burnishers as seen here, available at art supply stores.







For Small Dry Transfers:

Lay the backing paper over the transfer and burnish to set the adhesive. Burnishing can be done with a cotton swab, a flat blade tool made fro wood or plastic or one of the fancy burnishers available at art supply stores. If necessary any excess adhesive can be removed with rubber cement thinner also available at art supply stores.

IMPORTANT NOTES ON CLEARS: Although not necessary, a mist coat of lacquer can be applied if desired, but a heavy, wet coat of lacquer can cause certain colors to bleed. Any acrylic clear can be used without fear of color bleed. It is only wet coats of solvent based clears that will cause problems.


* Thanks to Archer Transfer for the instructions.